Thursday, 7 February 2019

Anyone can donate a kidney for
Jonathan Kalmakoff

Our very productive, passionate, award winning, genealogist-historian Jonathan Kalmakoff needs a working kidney.

In 2002 he was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease (PKD), an inherited disease. In 2015 he began to cut back on activities, and by 2018 required dialysis which he is doing daily at home.

He also needs our financial support to raise his 3 kids and to continue to add to the thousands of articles, names, locations, ancestries and records posted on his Doukhobor Genealogy Website and Doukhobor Message Board since 1999. Jon is still young and only about half done with his research. Don't let him stop.

The USCC announced Jon's dilemma during the 2018 Christmas Eve program, also on live stream video December 24, with other announcements projected on the large screen using images from his websites. See the video segment at time 57:21 to 58:35. A month later his former home town newspaper published an article. Jon lives and works in Regina.
Though several of his friends and family members offered to be living donors and were disqualified, anyone can donate a kidney for Jonathan.

The Kidney Paired Donation (KPD) Program of Canada allows anyone to donate a kidney to any recipient, whether or not their kidneys match, and from anyplace in the world.

The KPD Program increases the probability for people in need of a kidney transplant, like Jon, to be restored to better health, and saved from death.

If your kidney is incompatible (not a match) for Jon, your kidney data goes into the Canadian Transplant Registry (CTR), a database that matches your kidney to the best recipient (not Jon), and a different kidney from the registry goes to Jon. It's like if one puts money in a bank in BC to give to someone who takes the money out in SK. We know it's not exactly the same money, but the value is the same. Meanwhile, the money you deposited in BC gets circulated to other people.


On the average, 4 to 5 people get a kidney due to the chain of transplants from 1 donated kidney.

People who donate a kidney can live normal lives with only one kidney because "...the single normal kidney will increase in size to compensate for the loss of the donated kidney." Recovery after surgery varies. See What to Expect After Donation. To donate a kidney, contact your provincial organ donor office. More than 99% do not regret donating their kidney. Best of all, Jon will be your buddy for life.

If you cannot donate your kidney, please donate a few dollars to support his research costs.


Details

Note: Alvin Roth and Lloyd Shapley were awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in economic science for developing the algorithms that are required to match large numbers of donors and recipients in KPD. See their math: Massó, Jordi. The theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design. The Nobel Prize in Economics 2012 for Alvin E. Roth and Lloyd S. Shapley, Contributions to Science 11:103-112 (2015)

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